AUCKLAND SOLAR ENERGY HOUSE

Modern 609m2 house with 4.5kW photovoltaics, solar hot water, wetback powering energy efficient appliances. Come and see!

Contact us today to visit the solar energy house and get extensive hints, tips and notes for free as part of the tour...

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Why We Used A Concrete Tank & Where Did We Put

The Inlets / Outtake / Overflow / Vent...

Why Concrete is Better To Store Water In For Drinking?

Concrete Tanks Make A Significant Impact On Water Quality...

New Zealand rainwater has a low PH on average about 5.4. [ref 1]

This water is acidic. Rainwater is naturally acidic due to the dissolution of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, forming carbonic acid in the rain. Left in its natural state rain water will remain acidic in the storage tank. (PH below 7 is acidic, PH 7.0 is neutral and PH greater than 7.0 is alkaline).

 

Storage of rainwater in "Concrete" tanks will raise the PH levels. Surveys have shown that concrete tanks have a median PH 7.5, where other tanks (i.e. PEm, steel and fibreglass) had a median PH of 5.9 [ref 2] The raising of the PH occurs naturally by the alkaline cement particles (containing CaCO3) mixing with the water [ref 3] in the concrete tank.

There are numerous studies undertaken overseas by Doctors and Health professionals that show benefits from higher PH drinking water. Alkaline water which is also referred to as "lonised" water, has shown to improve allergies, skin disease, abdominal complaints and many more ailments. [ref 4]

What Is The Advantages Of Higher 'PH' Water?

A Concrete Tank Provides Greater Insulation...

Concrete tanks that are above ground and more so for those buried provide greater insulation from heat and light and therefore the water temperature is maintained at a more constant temperature. Direct sunlight and increase in water temperature can increase the growth of bacteria and algae in water storage tanks.

Concrete tanks can be either fully or partially buried which increase the aesthetics of the site.

Concrete Tanks Can Be Buried! (aka hidden from sight)

Acidic water may dissolve domestic copper piping and over time could cause pinhole leaks in the plumbing system. [ref 5] Acidic water may also cause leaching of the copper into the water supply and this deposits itself on the bathroom fittings causing a green or grensh blue stain. [ref 6]

Possible Damage To Your Plumbing System & Bathroom Fittings...

Solar Energy House C/- Simon & Kristina Cope | 19 Manapau Street, Meadowbank, Auckland 1072  |  New Zealand  |  Contact us now to arrange your tour

References:

1 Kingett Mitchell & Associates: Preliminary examination of the nature of urban runoff in New Zealand: August 2001.

2 Kingett Mitchell & Associates: House Roof Runoff: Is it as clean as we think: 2nd South Pacific Stomwater conference 2001

3 Quek, U & Foster (1993): and Thomas & Greene (1993) Rainwater quality from different catchements.

4 Best Water: www.waterionizer.org/Articles & Research

5 Journal AWWA, August 2001, Vol 93m, pp 82-91 and www.toolbase.org.

Macomber, Patricia: Guidelines on Rainwater Catchment Systems.

'A' in the diagram: OUT-TAKE

For the Out-Take pipe we wanted this at the TOP of the tank (as it was being buried I didn't want the job in 5-10 yrs time to dig down to the bottom cause we had a leak...)

But what size hole? With a concrete tank you tell them what size & where :-)

 

We decided to have a 1" (25mm) diameter out-take. The best thing we found on the market to use was a NZ made Hansen fitting: SFTFT25 (found at your local plumber outlet).

HoleSizes

What Size Holes Do You Need To Make For Your Intake Pipe, Out-take Pipe, Overflow Pipe, & Vent?

'B' in the diagram: OVERFLOW

For the Overflow pipe we wanted this to incorporate vacuum mechanism so when tank is FULL the rubbish that might collect on the bottom is sucked out.... But what size hole? With a concrete tank you tell them what size & where :-)

 

Because we were using Marley's vacuum kit this uses a 90mm internal diameter pipe.  

'C' in the diagram: VENT

For the Out-Take pipe we wanted this at the TOP of the tank (as it was being buried I didn't want the job in 5-10 yrs time to dig down to the bottom cause we had a leak...)

But what size hole? With a concrete tank you tell them what size & where :-)

 

We decided to have a 1" (25mm) diameter out-take. The best thing we found on the market to use was a NZ made Hansen fitting: SFTFT25

'D' in the diagram: INLET

For the Out-Take pipe we wanted this at the TOP of the tank (as it was being buried I didn't want the job in 5-10 yrs time to dig down to the bottom cause we had a leak...)

But what size hole? With a concrete tank you tell them what size & where :-)

 

We decided to have a 1" (25mm) diameter out-take. The best thing we found on the market to use was a NZ made Hansen fitting: SFTFT25